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Autor: howard - La question Finkler 9781408818466 (Edition Chinois)…

Entrada de archivo:
Howard: La question Finkler 9781408818466 (Edition Chinois) [2011] ISBN:9781408818466 - Libro

(?):

La question Finkler 9781408818466 (Edition Chinois) [2011] ISBN:9781408818466 (?)

Entrega de: FranciaLibro usado, no un nuevo libro.
en francés, Bloomsbury Publishing PLC, Utiliza
Broché, Label: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC, Bloomsbury Publishing PLC, Produktgruppe: Book, Publiziert: 1000, Studio: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Palabras clave: Actu, Politique et Société, Art, Musique et Cinéma, Bandes dessinées et Humour, Beaux livres, Cuisine et Vins, Dictionnaires, langues et encyclopédies, Droit, Entreprise et Bourse, Érotisme, Ésotérisme et Paranormal, Études supérieures, Histoire, Informatique et Internet, Jeunesse, Littérature, Littérature sentimentale, Livres audio, Loisirs créatifs, décoration et bricolage, Manga, Nature, animaux et jardinage, Policier et Suspense, Religions et Spiritualités, SF, Fantasy et Terreur, Santé et Bien-être, Sciences humaines, Sciences, Techniques et Médecine, Scolaire et Parascolaire, Sports et autres loisirs, Tourisme et Voyages, Poche et Broché, Caractères standards
Datos de 27/03/2013 23:52h
Entrada de archivo:
Howard: Die Finkler Question 9781408818466 (Chinesisch Ausgabe) [2011] ISBN:9781408818466 - Libro

(?):

Die Finkler Question 9781408818466 (Chinesisch Ausgabe) [2011] ISBN:9781408818466 (?)

Entrega de: AlemaniaAlemán del libroEste es un libro de bolsilloLibro usado, no un nuevo libro.
en alemán, Bloomsbury Publishing PLC, Libro en rústica, Utiliza
Taschenbuch, Label: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC, Bloomsbury Publishing PLC, Produktgruppe: Book, Publiziert: 1000, Studio: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Palabras clave: Antiquarische Bücher, Belletristik, Biografien & Erinnerungen, Business & Karriere, Börse & Geld, Comics & Mangas, Computer & Internet, Erotik, Esoterik, Fachbücher, Fantasy & Science Fiction, Film, Kunst & Kultur, Freizeit, Haus & Garten, Geschenkbücher, Horror, Kalender, Kinder- & Jugendbücher, Kochen & Genießen, Krimis & Thriller, Lernen & Nachschlagen, Musiknoten, Naturwissenschaften & Technik, Politik & Geschichte, Ratgeber, Reise & Abenteuer, Religion & Glaube, Sport & Fitness, Taschenbuch, Neu, Gebraucht, Normale Größe
Datos de 27/03/2013 23:52h
Entrada de archivo:

(?):

Remarkable Archive preserved by his close friend Adrian BRUNEL, (Leslie, 1893-1943, Actor & Film Director) (1945) (?)

Entrega de: Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del norteProbablemente inglés librofirma o pie de imprenta
probablemente en inglés, Firmado
(1889-1958, Film Director & Screenwriter), from the earliest days of their collaboration in 1920, including 4 long original signed letters from Leslie Howard in America, 1920-1921, letters from AB about their respective careers preserved in AB's file copies, including AB's plans for a modern 'Pimpernel' story in the Spanish Civil War, 1938, stunning internal memos during the production of 'The First of the Few', newspaper extracts including the Anglo-Portuguese News during LH's last visit to Lisbon, notices of the LH Memorial Tribute at Denham, 1944, with AB's own typed notes of his contribution, Ian Colvin's articles in the Daily Mail ahead of publishing 'Flight 777', 1956, and fine letters from LH's sister Irene and daughter Leslie Ruth, the archive is full of insights into the film industry and the characters of those involved, with descriptive Checklist, 56 items in 10 groups on 89 sides Folio, 4to or 8vo, England, Portugal and America, 1920 - 1956, some of the newspaper cuttings worn as noted, otherwise in good condition Adrian Brunel was highly regarded, especially in the Silent Era, for his innovation and wit (often revealed in the 'intertitles'). Two of his 'lost' films are on the British Film Institute's 'most wanted' list. He joined with Leslie Howard to create six comedy shorts in 1920, written by A.A. Milne (see item 1), made a name for himself in the '20s while Leslie Howard was acting in the U.S.A. and the U.K., then in the mid-'30s turned briefly to writing plays (items 14,15). Hearing that Leslie Howard was looking for 'a modern Pimpernel Story', he wrote 'Don Arturo in Spain' (1938, items 16-19) which was not taken up owing to the war (but see the verso of item 19, which has a page of draft dialogue, curiously sinister). His work on 'The First of the Few', (1942, with Leslie Howard as the designer of the 'Spitfire'), is best told in his own words (items 20-34), as is his tribute to Howard (1944, item 48). LH Leslie Howard. Ruth Howard (née Martin, Leslie's wife, 3rd March 1916). Ronald Howard (1918-1996), LH's son 'Wink', wrote 'In search of my father', 1981. Leslie Ruth Howard (Mrs Leslie Dale-Harris, 1924-8th January 2013) of Toronto, LH's daughter 'Doodie', wrote 'A Quite Remarkable Father', 1959. Irene Howard (1903-1981), Casting director, LH's sister. AB Adrian Brunel, wrote 'Nice Work. The story of thirty years in British Film Production', 1949. Babs (1890 or 1891-1986), his wife, 6th March 1916. She had a part in his first film 'The Cost of a Kiss' (1917). PCS Philip C. Samuel, films Production Manager for Leslie Howard Productions. C.M. Woolf (1879-1942), Film Distributor, right-hand man to j. Arthur Rank. D.W. Griffith (1875-1948), Director, founder of United Artists. Leslie Mason, Screenwriter of 'The Man from Monterey' (1933). Lynn Fontanne (1887-1983), British Actress. Sir Nigel Playfair (1874-1934), Actor & Theatre Manager. Sidney Drew (1863-1919) & Mrs Sidney Drew (née Lucile McVey, 1890-1925, his second wife), who supplied the ideas and scenarios and did most of the directing in their more than 150 silent films. John Gliddon, Actor and Agent. Leigh Aman (1913-1990, 2nd Baron Marley), Film Producer. Sir John Clements (1910-1988), Actor & Theatre Manager. Alfred T. Chenhalls, F.C.A., Director of Omnia Films. Accompanied LH to Lisbon, 1943. CONTENTS A. Minerva in London and Leslie Howard in America, 1920-1921. 'The Globe' on the state of the industry and introducing Minerva's first films (1920), 4 fine long letters from LH about playing in America but also promoting their films, famous stars he has danced with and his own prospects there (1920-1921), and letters between AB and Leslie Ruth Dale-Harris who has borrowed these originals for quoting in her book (1957). 8 items on 19 sides. B. Minerva dormant, 1925-1927. Letters from LH's father (1925) and Barclays Bank (1927) asking about the state of the Company, and a pair of AB's file dividers bearing the title of a short film and 'HOWARD - Leslie'. 3 items on 6 sides. C. Brunel writing Plays and Leslie Howard as Hamlet, 1936-1940. AB's copies of his letters to LH, about AB's plays and his plans for LH, including AB sending a modern 'Pimpernel' story 'Don Arturo in Spain' with a page of manuscript dialogue for it on the back (1936-1940), and an article by 'Atticus' comparing LH's and Gielgud's 'Hamlets' playing simultaneously in New York (1936). 8 items on 9 sides. D. 'The First of the Few', 1941-1942. AB proposes himself to the management as "general technical supervisor" to LH as director. AB explains that his long friendship with LH plus his own experience will allow him to make suggestions calmly and tactfully. These stunning 'inside' memos - a primary source - show how AB was drawn in as 'nurse-maid' to important assignments on location and to liaising with the Air Ministry, culminating in his actual pass for filming at Northolt (1941-1942). 15 items on 20 sides. E. 'The Gentle ***', 1943. Programme with full list of credits for the première at the Odeon, Leicester Square, and AB's ticket for the reception afterwards at Claridge's (1943). F. Leslie Howard in Portugal, 1943. The Lisbon 'Anglo-Portuguese News' in both languages, featuring LH and his lectures, his address to the Press about a European Federation of the Cinema and its importance to smaller countries, and notices of famous British war films, including LH's (6th May 1943), and LH's delightful 'Conversation' between Will Shakespeare and LH, about the bard's own view of Hamlet (3rd June 1943). Parts of 2 issues on 6 sides. G. Leslie Howard and Oscar Nemon, 1943. Cutting showing Nemon's bust of LH, with his recollections about LH's state of mind (6th June 1943). 1 item on 1 side. H. The Howard family, 1943-1946. Card to AB from LH's father (1943), newspaper cutting about LH's will (1944), affectionate letter from Irene Howard to AB (1945), solicitor giving Ruth Howard's address after sale of Stowe Maries in 1945 (1946). 4 items on 9 sides. I. Tributes to Leslie Howard, 1944, on the BBC (1) and at Denham Studios (7). An article regretting the absence of AB from the BBC tribute (23rd February 1944), arrangements at Denham, AB's original typed notes for his contribution featuring 'Pimpernel Smith', and press reports of the occasion (19th May - 9th June 1944). 8 items on 10 sides. j. The Daily Mail, 1956. Parts of 5 (of 6) issues with extracts and photographs from Ian Colvin's forthcoming book 'Flight 777', LH's last on 1st June 1943 (Monday 10th - Friday 14th September 1956). 5 items on 6 sides. INDIVIDUAL ITEMS PACKET A. Minerva in London and Leslie Howard in America, 1920-1921. 1. 2nd October 1920, London. 'The Globe' newspaper side 3, 'The Talk of the Screen', 4 columns plus advertisements about current companies, their films, studios and methods of production, including "'Minerva' Comedies By A.A. Milne ... on Wednesday [6th] at the West End Cinema will be shown the first of a series ... 'The Bump', 'Bookworms', and '£5 reward'. In the first Aubrey Smith plays the leading part, Leslie Howard features in the others ...", and describing 'Bookworms' in humorous detail, the film then shows "how this enterprising tactician [Leslie Howard as 'Richard'] wins his way into Miranda's heart ... 'Young Master Cupid' is played by little David Evans, aged three, the son of the Sporting Editor of 'The Globe'. The whole series is produced by Mr. Adrian Brunel". 2 sides 19¾" x 15¼". LH had first met A.A. Milne when rehearsing 'Mr. Pim Passes By' the year before. 2. 1st November 1920, Hotel Woodstock, New York, as from Henry Miller's Theatre [now the Stephen Sondheim], 43rd Street. Long ALS from LH to AB, on his first opening night in America, "Just a hasty line ... as I have to get ready in a few minutes for our first performance" of 'Just Suppose', from the Press Notices AB has sent about Minerva "there seems no doubt that we have made a considerable impression", and if "our receipts pay our way we shall ... proceed to better things with a lot of useful experience ... Lesley Mason", the screenwriter ('The Man from Monterey', 1933), "is convinced they would appeal to American buyers ... Milne writes for some of the magazines, and is about to have one or two plays done. Aubrey is well known, & even my humble self has been getting some publicity", LH asks for copies of their films, which "Mason himself will take round to likely people & we can show them the stuff", suggesting 'The Bump' and '£5', "It means a small outlay but I think it worth taking the risk ... Anyway through the run I can get in touch with the best people & put the 'fluence' on them ...Your letter to Playfair", (Sir Nigel, 1874-1934), who had acted in silent films and now managed the Lyric Hammersmith, "was excellent ... You have been a brick about that typewriter business & I shall forward you some dollars ... Am very glad Bramlins is going through", apparently Bramlins Industrial Films, "Tell Payne to push it about that I am going to film over here as I hope to shortly ... Yours ever". 4 sides tall 8vo. 3. 12th December 1920, Henry Miller's Theatre. Long enthusiastic part-typed ALS from LH to AB, he is anxious to know the decision about the future of Minerva, but has had some "very interesting conversations with Mrs Sydney Drew", (Lucile McVey, 1890-1925, second wife of Sidney Drew, 1863-1919), whom he met "at a dance ... our company ... interested her enormously ... She gave me her life's history and incidentally mentioned that she wrote all the Drew comedies ... I imagine she ... had to overcome the greatest prejudice in persuading people that there was a market for that kind of stuff. She is launching out with five reel comedy dramas in the New Year and I expect to play in some of these", he talks of dancing last Sunday "with H[er] M[ajesty] Dorothy Gish" and also at various times "with Norma Talmadge, Alice Joyce, Mae Murray and Mabel Normand, the latter very drunk at the time & insisting ... I should at once go with her to California to play in Goldwyn films" at "the City of the Angels ... Charlie Chaplin was ... at our table and (while he was still sober) I had a little chat with him and found him quite a nice little cockney ... Our play ... is really almost the best acted on Broadway (tho' it's me that says it)", he is "at last beginning to feel moderately at home in New York", although everything presents "the maximum amount of difficulty to the unwary stranger", the street cars are "of armoured car pattern ... and only personal influence with the conductor" results in the doors "being opened to one", he shall "of course be delighted to do anything ... to help Gliddon", (John, the actor and agent), "during his stay here", he wishes he was back "to arrange things" about Minerva, "but it is so difficult to make any money now in England", comparing the salaries, "There is a strong tendency now for the picture producers to leave California and come East. [D.W.] Griffith is permanently settled just outside New York ... His 'Way down East' which is still running here (3 months at 1 theatre) was entirely produced round this part of the world", and ending with sympathy "for the time you have been having over the Baby boy", who he hopes is "going to turn over a new leaf", and a p.S. "hoping to send you a cheque next mail ...". 4 sides Folio. 4. 18th March 1921, Parkway Hotel, Chicago. TLS with autograph postscript, "At last I am sending you the cheque (or ... check) ... to tell you the truth I have only just straightened out my bank account in London ... previously suffering from a prolonged drought", after "several big cities ... we are now here for a run of probably six weeks or more", though he longs to be home he has had "several offers" on "good terms ... I am getting now quite a smallish salary for this country", $250 a week, if he is offered $400 he "can hardly afford to give it up. In any case I am coming home for the summer but shall return with my family complete in the autumn if I get my terms. The rotten part ... is that everyone has to travel after the play finishes in New York", which "puts one out of the running for film work ... which one can do while the play is running there", he talks of Lynn Fontanne (1887-1983) who "is here with her new play 'Dulcy' ... She plays the part of a 'bromide lady' if you know what I mean ... We all danced together the other night", he longs to hear if "Minerva ... still exists ... Milne has had quite a big success over here with 'Mr Pim' ... I could not play in it as they would not release me ... I ... have started a play and have another in mind. For myself of course", and "a series of humorous reminiscences entitled the 'American Adventures of an English Actor' ... perhaps you would give them to your friend at (I believe) Hughes Massie", the literary agents, "I still have hopes that you and I may one day be able to do something together in the film line. I have seen several studios over here ... If only we could find some old gentleman with a million or so loose", with a p.S. sending "a snapshot [not present] taken on the beach at Atlantic City ...". 3 sides 8vo. 5. 21st May 1921, Hotel Pantlind, Grand Rapids, Michigan. TLS LH to AB, "Just a line to let you know that we are sailing for England on the 7th May by the 'Lapland' ... I don't know quite what I am going to do or even whether I am going to stay in England this autumn. Lynn Fontanne wants me to return to New York and play with her ... It depends on what sort of offers I get in London. I plan to take Winkie", his son Ronald (1918-1996), "for a holiday when I get back but should not mind doing a film first ... All news when we meet". 1 side Folio. 6. 20th September 1957. Carbon copy TLS from AB to LH's daughter Leslie (Mrs Dale-Harris), at 45 St. James's Close, Prince Albert Road, NW8, sending "four of your father's letters", as above, adding "Guard them with your life", saying she may "of course ... use them" for her book but not "in articles ... because I am quoting from them in a couple ... also, in a broadcast", suggesting they meet "on Wednesday at my club, the Savile ... London tires me so these days and has done increasingly for about 14 years!", he will explain, "since it has a close connection with dear Leslie. Babs (my wife)" reminds me "of my present resemblance to Claude Rains. So we'll be sure to recognise each other. I sent you a copy of my film reminiscences, NICE WORK, yesterday". 1 side Folio. 7. 28th October 1957, 6 Warren Road, Toronto. ALS Leslie Dale-Harris to AB, "must think I have made off for ever with your letters from Leslie ... time was short, so, without your permission I brought them here and put them directly into my work ... both quotes and references ... I cannot tell you how splendid it was to be able to do so", asking to quote from 'Nice Work' on page 64 about Minerva, and perhaps later from "your short 'obit' of daddy", and hoping his "consultation with the doctor was successful ... Keep your fingers crossed for me these next few months ... the Muse being rather faint and unhelpful!". 3 sides 8vo. 8. 9th November 1957. Carbon copy TL from AB to Leslie Dale-Harris in Toronto, saying the letters came "this morning", her handwriting was "like seeing a ghost - the resemblance to your father's is uncanny ... You may quote as much as you like from NICE WORK ... I shall be honoured ... IF you set aside a time every day for writing, noting, and so on, you'll be surprised how it builds up ... do collect as many photos as you can - not only of your father, but of the famous stars who have played with him - and then high-pressure your publisher ... Oh yes, and ... see that you have a good index. Both these things help to sell biographies", ending "... seeing you ... did me good. With love". 1 side Folio. PACKET B - Minerva Dormant, 1925-1927. 9. 19th February 1925, The London Merchant Bank, 38 Lombard Street. TLS from Frederick Stainer to AB, thanking him "for the interesting information ... re our Minerva Films. I only hope the original scenario of G.B.S. will be forthcoming soon", and asking "for the official address of the Company, i.e. where one can register a transfer of shares, or rather lodge a probate of the will of a deceased shareholder". 1 side oblong 8vo. 10. 8th November 1927, Barclays Bank, Westminster. TLS from the Manager to AB at 192 Queens Gate, SW7, "re. Minerva Films Ltd A/c", transferring the balance of £28.6.8 to "a Deposit Passbook account", they will "be glad to know the present position of the above firm". 1 side Folio 11. No date, perhaps circa 1930. Two buff covers of a folder, the upper labelled 'The Man who wouldn't Answer Letters', with tabs added and marked 'Howard - Leslie'. 4 sides folio. AB often used 'The Man Who ...' in the titles of his short films. PACKET C - Brunel writing Plays and Leslie Howard as Hamlet, 1936-1940. 12. 17th September 1936. Carbon copy TL from AB to LH at Stowe Maries, he is just back "from ... yachting at Dinard", and anxious to say "I have just had about six months holiday during which I have written two books - the first, a play, comes out in about a fortnight", but he is "returning to the film business, and in much happier circumstances than recently, I hope". 1 side folio. 13. circa November 1936. Part article by 'Atticus' from the 'Sunday Times' including a photo of LH, on the "competing productions of 'Hamlet' on Broadway ... Apparently Mr Gielgud scored a decisive victory ... Mr. Howard did not go without a dignified, if inadvisable, farewell ... He reproached the New York critics with their frivolity, implying that there was something rotten in more places than Denmark", and though Atticus has "never seen Mr. Howard play it ... to my mind Howard is Hamlet ... Once we crossed in the same ship ... and I was not only much struck with the sadness of his smile and the gentle music of his voice, but ... he stood apart ... as though we were the players and he the onlooker at the Court of that old villain King Neptune ...", preferring him to Gielgud's "gusty and efficient" interpretation. 1 column 9" x 2½", the article incomplete at beginning and end. 14. 6th March 1937. Carbon copy TL from AB to LH in America, introducing Leigh Aman, (1913-1990, film producer), "just off to America with his father Lord Marley ... who is going to collect money for the persecuted Jews of Europe", Aman "worked with me for two years ... the best assistant I have ever had", who with "the temporary collapse of the British film industry" is "going to Hollywood to see what he can learn ... Today being the 21st anniversary of my marriage, Babs and I send our greetings to Leslie and Ruth", (married the same month in 1916), Brunel is "about to become a famous playwright", having sold "two plays in the last six weeks", including "ONLY YESTERDAY", hoping that thereby "I may wangle my way to Hollywood". 1 side folio. 15. 18th January 1938. Carbon copy TL from AB to LH at Stowe Maries, sending some "wonderful notices" of 'Only Yesterday' [not present], he has "an offer from the Haymarket ... to put it on with ... Edna Best, Leslie Banks, Mary Clare and Laurence Olivier" as suggested cast, but "as I cannot wait indefinitely", John Clements will "produce it at his Intimate Theatre, at Palmers Green ... it will not have a swagger cast but at least the benefit of John Clements' production and of his playing the principal part ... if you could bear the thought of travelling so far on a cold winter's night", Brunel "would weep tears of gratitude", while of Howard's new film, "failing myself as your collaborator, I cannot think of anybody better than Anthony Asquith ...". 1 side folio. 16. 30th June 1938. Carbon copy TL from AB to LH at Stowe Maries, sending "a copy of the Spanish Civil War story that I mentioned ... 'Don Arturo in Spain' [not present]", he is going "to Cannes on Sunday for a holiday and to do some work on this first draft ...". 1 side folio. 17. 31st August 1938. Carbon copy TL from AB to LH, explaining why AB's letter from Cannes never arrived, "I now hear that you have ... all the stories you want", he had written his "Spanish story ... with you in mind and I imagined its topicality made it such an urgent matter to me that I telephoned you for the first time in eighteen years", in the meantime Twentieth Century Fox's agent has sent it to Hollywood "with a glowing report ... I would so much like to see you", he has two plays due to be put on in London and is just finishing a third, "and yet, exciting as the prospect is, my main interest is to get back to the studio floor", about Pygmalion's success, "I can't tell you how pleased I am". 1 side folio. 18. 19th October 1938. Carbon copy TL from AB to LH, saying "only two firms have read" the Spanish story, including M.G.M., "and they have both sent it immediately to Hollywood", his play "was a great success in Liverpool and did wonderful business in spite of the crisis", he wants LH to remember it is called 'Eve had no father' because "in about ten years time I am going to ask you to play the very attractive leading part. But I must wait until you can play the part of a man of fifty". 1 side folio. 19. 9th October 1940. TLS 'Adrian' to 'My dear Leslie', saying "Some time before the war I sent you the enclosed script - DON ARTURO IN SPAIN [not present]. I think you must have been in Hollywood and possibly you never received it. It is a modern Pimpernel story that I outlined to Alex K[orda] ... by the time I had finished, Alex had changed his mind - he hadn't even read it, he told me frankly with his irresistible charm! ... To my surprise three of the big companies showed an interest ... but it would have been dangerous politically ... However times have changed; if Spain comes into the war against us, the story could stand; or alternatively ... the action could take place in France. As I hear you are looking for a modern Pimpernel story ... I would be very grateful if you could read it", he hears also that "you are a neighbour of mine ... on your way to or from Denham ... call on us ... in the main street of Beaconsfield", a resident here "said he remembered me at Bushey and that 'we were both friends of Leslie Howard's", with a p.S. "I had a cable from Lynn [Fontanne] ... to say she was speaking to England on the radio, but the cable arrived too late ...", with a dialogue in AB's hand on the verso. 2 sides folio. With the printed heading 'A.H. & j.C. Brunel, Instructional, Educational and Propaganda Films ... Beaconsfield' and details about Adrian, 'Film Director and Author ...' and son Christopher, 'Studio Technician ...'. On the back in pencil, headed [page] 33, are 26 lines of dialogue in AB's hand between P[enn], I[...], S[...], Ortez 'of the International Brigade' and Sergeant Harcourt, Penn reminds Harcourt of 'that famous occasion at Edwardes Square' and 'Barrett's Club - the back entrance in the yard ... early this evening' and 'meeting' Harcourt's truncheon. PACKET D - 'The First of the Few', 1941-1942. 20. 2nd July 1941, A.H. & j.C. Brunel, 28 Park Mansions, S.W.1. TL from AB to PCS (carbon copy of LH to see) with "a suggestion" for LH's next production, first summarizing his own experience as a director and as one who "for four years ... had the finest training in the world, making acceptable and even very successful pictures for next to nothing. I therefore know how to get the most out of every pound spent, and to think quickly", he has "experience wider than most directors as ... an editor - the highest paid in Europe! ... I am better able ... to understand the camera's problems and to help him ... I have written innumerable scripts and according to Alex [Korda] (as well as myself) am the best technical man at this job - for I can write stuff that can be shot and ... the dialogue I write can be spoken", if AB were "general technical supervisor", LH "as director ... would then have at your side someone who could really help you in every department ... who speaks your language and can understand your point of view (which I guess would generally be my own) ... doing the job wisely and with tact", with a p.S., enclosing "some excerpts [not present] dealing with my comedy work" from notices "prepared for Alex when we were discussing ... my becoming general comedy adviser to his company". 2 sides folio. 21. 11th July 1941, Denham Studios. TLS from Philip Samuel to AB at Denham Studios, saying that "when Leslie is in a receptive mood" he will "certainly put" AB's letter "before him". 1 side folio. 22. [August 1941]. Carbon of AB's typed 'Suggested contents of note to PCS', saying he "began on the picture on 21st. of July and at the end of this week, it will be 3 weeks ... for the next two weeks" he will be "taking tests and on the script, with Leslie and Tolly, and then with Miles Malleson and Leslie" then prepare for "a lot of important collaboration with Leslie on the exteriors" from 8th September, but he is prepared to give his services free for 3 weeks "from next Monday" until 1st September, adding "Personal to Phil: ... I should be instrumental in saving you thousands of pounds and easing Leslie's path for him while shooting ... Leslie expects a lot of me and although to be a Superviser is not my ambition in life, it is my aim to make both you and Leslie glad you called me in ...". 1 side 4to. 23. 29th October 1941, 'Leslie Howard Productions'. PCS to AB, Typed Signed Memo 'Morning Call', saying that "... having disposed of the location and practically all the other work necessary with the R.A.F. personnel, other than the 'B' unit ... the schedule ... is ... very reasonable" and "averages well under two minutes per day on the floor", so "to avoid ... unnecessary ... travelling in the black-out ... the call is for 8.30 a.m. for 9.00 a.m. ... to start lining up the first shot of the day. NO rushes can be seen ... except at 1.45 p.m.", except for "checking a doubtful shot on a report from the Cutting Department ... an early finish each day is entirely up to you". 1 side folio. On the back are some intriguing pencillings by AB, including 'von Denheim' as a possible name for a character! 24. 13th November 1941, Leslie Howard Productions. Long Typed Signed Memo from PCS to AB 'Change of Organisation', "... owing ... to the number of days being lost each week, we have ... had to change our organisation on the floor through the insistance of C.M. Woolf" (of the j. Arthur Rank organisation), "In a nut-shell, I am selected as the victim ... even Leslie is co-operating 100% - Lord only knows if he will continue when I am taking in many cases opposite views to his", AB "will become the 'nurse-maid in chief' to the B Unit", previously "more or less under my guidance", as well as handling "the montages and necessary B.P. plates for the A Unit", PCS suggests that "after ... the Unit [is] working smoothly, you pop back to London" to go over PCS's notes, "and take over ... including possibly the Air Ministry and Fighter Command liaison ... as roughly four hours of my day is spent on the floor", also, while AB is "down at Southampton ... I do hope you will see Mr. Cooper the chief designer of Vickers at Hursley Park, as he I think can give you the missing link in the montage of the S.4 story", and "more than likely" introduce AB to "somebody at Weybridge so that we can borrow ... one of the designers to do the actual drawings and ... samples of calculations ... we can have Mr. Bridgeman ... the artist who does all the sketches in the aeroplane ... in about 10 to 14 days time", he is anxious to know how long "the Spitfire montage at Vickers" will take "so that I can prepare the Air Ministry for our requirements for the Messerschmitt air shots ...". 2 sides folio. The film preserves historic footage of the Supermarine S.4 taking off from Southampton water. Mitchell created this new, 'clean', monoplane for the 1925 Schneider Trophy race. It held the world airspeed record for a month before crashing in trials in the U.S., before the actual race. 25. 14th November 1941, Cathedral Hotel, Salisbury. Carbon copy TL from AB to PCS, enclosing "my plan of campaign for the 1935-6 montages [not present]", which is "quite clear" to "Eric Ross and Alex Saville", "we took some shots to-day at the Wilts and Dorset [Bus Company] place, very difficult in that noise", he is going "to High Posts" (?High Post on the downs north of Salisbury) "early tomorrow morning and then on to the Wilts and Dorset ... It will then be safe to leave it to Eric and Alec and I can get back to Denham", adding "most of the shots were medium shots" so they may go back for "close-ups of the workers and of their work". 1 side folio. 26. 16th November 1941, First House, Bulstrode Way, Gerrards Cross. Carbon copy TL from AB to PCS, saying "I was engaged to advise Leslie technically and to help him as tactfully as I could" over "the technical side of script writing, directing and cutting ...", it was "rightly assumed" that AB would be "neither assertive or argumentative ... Leslie has always been attentive, receptive and reasonable. And generously grateful", but "apart from 'oiling the wheels' ... it has never been my function to dictate the speed of shooting ... though I have done my best to assist it", however, "I do realise that you have a most unfortunate combination of circumstances and personalities to contend with, and I care sufficiently for the production to make what I consider sacrifices", AB "will certainly help with these montages and the other odds and ends (much as I dislike this sort of work)", trusting "you will do your best to relieve me of them as soon as possible", so that "I can be of most use to Leslie and to the picture", adding "your strong dose of ginger" may already have "done the trick ... I have been enjoying a most unpleasant and lingering attack of ... gastric flu". 1 side folio. 27. circa ?March 1942. Typed Notes by AB, apparently for a telephone conversation with LH, saying that "Sammy", PCS, "was in today ... He is allowed to come to the studio for a short time every day" and suggests that "you and me and him - plus Doug Myers = John Dennis = Percy Day = and whoever else is essential to run thru say 3 REELS every day" and decide "1. What has got to be shot 2. Or got from newsreels, etc. 3. Or faked by Percy Day & Model Dept. 4. Or fitted with sound effects ...", owing to "engagements with doctors", PCS "has tentatively booked a theatre for 11.15 tomorrow ...". 1 side 8vo. 28. 10th March 1942. Carbon copy Typed Memo, signed with initials, from AB to LH, c.c. Mr Samuel, headed 'First Factory Montage', recalling that "at our showing of the film on Saturday ... a large chunk" of this montage "was chewed off by our unco-operative equipment and in our last minute rush we cut off 63 feet from the end of the music, instead of the beginning", since then "I have twice re-cut this sequence ... now ... down to one minute and three quarters" or 165 feet, "at 217 feet ... it told a story and had a rhythm", both chronologically and "with a view to a musical setting ... (Hazel - who has studied the montage on the moviola - would confirm this)", asking LH "what you think should be the maximum length ... too short an interlude, with music, might sound peculiar ... and ... with the superimposed voice saying 'Eight months ... seven months ... six months ...', it is a dramatic time-continuity device". 1 side folio. 29. 11th March 1942. Carbon copy Typed Memo, from AB to LH, headed 'Second Factory Montage', saying he has now got "the assembly of the prototype [Spitfire] down to 173 feet - just under two minutes ... Mitchell is considerably in this little sequence and we also see Mac", (probably 'MacPherson', played by Herbert Cameron), "it is simpler material ... than the First Factory montage, so perhaps it will stand this length ... If you still find it too long, I think I could get 25 feet out of it ...". 1 side folio. 30. 24th March 1942. Page with 2 Pencilled Autograph Draft Memos from AB, the recto to LH, headed 'First 1935 Montage (Pre-Factory)', saying he has "made out a plan for ... about 80 feet - consisting of three shots of Mitchell and four of drawings ... immediately after Mitchell's interview with Royce", and suggesting an order which "makes good continuity & has the advantage of reference to Royce", the verso is to PCS, titled 'Fremdenblatt', saying "Ivor Halstead does not know where the original exists; he is trying to trace a copy through a German friend who is the Editor of a German newspaper published in England", otherwise AB has asked him "to get other issues ... so that we can make up an insert to look genuine", using "a translation of our English text". 2 sides 8vo. 31. 1st April 1942. Carbon copy Typed Memo from AB to PCS, about naming AB in the credits, "It's difficult to describe a functionary who is everything and nothing ... montageur ... deputy director ... cheer leader! ... The safest and truest would be PRODUCTION CONSULTANT ... or ... ASSOCIATE PRODUCER ...", 'Adviser' would not be so good "from Leslie's point of view, as it might suggest I was in a position to boss Leslie ... the one thing I tried to avoid". 1 side folio. 32. 27th April 1942, Air Ministry. Original Typed Pass with manuscript additions, addressed to the Commanding Officer, R.A.F. Northolt, granting AB permission to visit the station "for the purpose of filming scenes for 'First of the Few'", valid "28th 29th & 30th April 1942, Subject to wartime exigencies", signed by S.G. Woodfield for the Director of Public Relations, "Flying facilities will NOT be afforded unless specifically stated above ... two copies of written material ... three copies of photographic material with captions, acquired as a result ... shall be submitted to the Ministry of Information ... Air Advisor ... the Air Ministry relies upon you not disclose" any secret or confidential information "to any other member of your organisation ...". 1 side folio. 33. No date. Mock Newspaper Article, as from 'The Sphere' for 10th October 1931, 7 photographs of 'Men of Mark', each with a comment on their activities, most prominent is Leslie Howard in Court Dress as R.j. Mitchell on receiving his C.B.E. 'for services in connection with the Schneider Trophy contest', the others include Herr ***, 'Still Hopeful after his recent defeat by Hindenburg' and Pierre Laval, but the remaining descriptions seem invented, with a touch of humour. 1 side 15¾" x 11¼". Pencilled 'Rough Proof', 'Mock-up for film insert - a number of photos are from Adrian Brunel's collection & are not of the people stated'. 34. No date, no place. Carbon copy Typed list 'For Leslie' headed 'Some Suggestions for Disc Quotations', beginning with 5 from Robert Burns, 'Wha sae base as be a slave ?' 'Man's inhumanity to man, Makes countless thousands mourn' ..., followed by 'Some French Quotations' (16) from Voltaire, La Rochefoucauld, Vauvenargues, Talleyrand and others, Sir Francis Bacon (5), Byron (4), Arthur Hugh Clough (2), including ' 'Tis better to have fought and lost, Than never to have fought at all', Coleridge (2), Emerson (5), J.S. Mill 'The price of liberty is eternal vigilance', and others. 3 sides folio. Is Brunel referring to Leslie Howard's 'Desert Island Discs' (23rd July 1942)? His first is William Walton's 'Spitfire Prelude and Fugue' from 'The First of the Few'. PACKET E - 'The Gentle ***', 1943. 35, 36. 18th April 1943. Programme for the première of 'The Gentle ***', with a full cast list and synopsis, directed by Leslie Howard and with Adrian Brunel as Production Consultant, also an invitation to the reception afterwards at Claridge's, Odeon, Leicester Square. 2 sides card 9" x 6" and 1 side card 3½" x 4½". The film portrays seven very different women in training at an A.T.S. camp and their different assignments as 'women-at-war', with four serving as ambulance drivers during 'very bad night blitz' before they are re-united Leslie Howard's last film, as the Voice of the Narrator. PACKET F - Leslie Howard in Portugal, 1943. 37. Thursday 6th May 1943, Lisbon. The Anglo-Portuguese News (published weekly by the Jornal do Comercio e das Colonias), No. 194, pp. 1-4, with articles in both languages, the cover showing LH, head and shoulders, with an original print of the same photograph, stamped on the verso 'Copyright Photo by Adrian Brunel, F.R.P.S.' and 'Please return' to him at Gerrards Cross in his hand, 6¼" x 4½". (a) p. 2, cols 2, 3. In 'Notes of the Week' (in English). Party on Friday [30th April] at the British Institute, including LH and Mr Chenhalls, 'Managing Director of Omnia Films', on 4th May LH "gave a most interesting address on 'Making a Film' at the Politeama Theatre, and on 6th May 'How an actor regards the part of Hamlet'" at the Teatro Nacional D. Maria II, to "large audiences, mainly Portuguese". On 5th May the Royal British Club entertained LH, Chenhalls, Martin Blake (Director of the Foreign Division, the British Council) to lunch. (b) p. 3, Col. 1. In 'Notes of the Week' (in Portuguese). (Translation) STAR OF THE CINEMA The project of a European Federation of the Cinema, which Mr. Leslie Howard has conceived and expounded in general terms, in conversation with the Press, at Vitória Films, deserves the warmest welcome, not only for its particular interest for the industry in benefiting all the small European countries whose cinematograph production has, up till now, stagnated for lack of markets, but still more for the opportunity it affords for their customs, traditions, folklore and landscapes to become known world wide. For our Country this idea, which Mr. Howard puts forward with such affection and enthusiasm and asks to be realized as soon as circumstances allow, is invested with an importance that needs no exaggeration. Through the Federation our films, whose field of expansion is limited to little more than Portugal, Spain and Brazil, will be introduced into, and appreciated by, all countries. There follow notices of "some great productions of the English cinema", 'In which we serve' (in Portuguese, 'Blood, Sweat and Tears'), 'Target for Tonight', 'I was a Fireman', 'Fires were Started', and 'The First of the Few', "in which Leslie Howard has again created an admirable role as the designer of the 'Spitfire' aeroplane with which the 'few', to the admiration of the world, conquered during the Battle of Great Britain". There are also notices of 'Young Mr. Pitt' (in Portuguese, 'Pitt, Napoleon's Conqueror'), drawing comparisons with Churchill, and of the article later in this issue [not present], by Rose Macaulay, the 'finissima observadora' of the relations of Portugal with Great Britain. (c) p. 4, cols 2,3. Article in English, 'Leslie Howard: A Lisbon Intermezzo', signed E.R.W., an amusing sketch of the crowd at "the Victoria Studios", where LH gave a press conference on "Wednesday night" [?28th April or 5th May], in three 'Acts'. The writer recalls the crowd scene in the 'Springtide Fête at Florence', early in the century at Drury Lane, and likens LH's quiet but commanding presence to Henry Irving's. 4 sides 13½" x 10". The 'Anglo-Portuguese News' was founded by Luis Marques, whom the Germans considered Winston Churchill's spokesman in Lisbon. He and his wife, Susan Lowndes, supported refugees and supplied the Allies with German news clippings. The film notices above refer to the 'terrifying bombardment of London', but the words 'German' and 'Germany' are never used. [Friday 21st May 1943. LH by train back from Madrid to Lisbon]. [Tuesday 1st June 1943. LH's plane shot down]. 38. Thursday 3rd June 1943, Lisbon. The Anglo-Portuguese News, pp. 7-8, with, in p. 8 Col. 2, 'A Conversation' by LH 'between Will Shakespeare and the Author', with lines such as "Me: ... after all you did write for the Elizabethan theatre. Will: I resent that. I wrote for the theatre", "Will: You want to cut those parts of Hamlet that mystify the audience? Me: That's the idea", later, "Will: Well, let's say it's the best play I ever re-wrote", the account of what Burbage asked him to do is masterly, in the end, "Will: ... I compromised, and put back a few killings and some of the early gags ... Burbage never really liked it ... Now tell me what you propose to do to Hamlet", apparently leaving LH speechless. 2 sides 13½" x 10". As 'Pimpernel Smith' said, 'Conversation should be pleasant without scurrility, witty without affectation, free without indecency'. PACKET G - Leslie Howard and Oscar Nemon, 1943. 39. Sunday 6th June 1943, London. Cutting from the 'Sunday Express', showing Oscar Nemon's bust of LH, which has a faraway look, and quoting Nemon: "As I worked on the bust Leslie seemed more and more to regard it as a memorial ... he would talk quietly of survival after death ... psychology and the human soul ... he did not want to act any more", but hoped "his whole future would be concerned with production and direction. Yet, when he spoke of the future, his quiet voice became quieter, almost wistfully sad". 1 side 12" x 4". On the verso is a notice of the film 'Colonel Blimp', featuring Roger Livesey, aged 38, and his wife Ursula Jeans. PICKET H - The Howard Family, 1943-1946. 40. 31st December 1943, Craven Hill Hotel, W.2. Greetings Card signed 'F. Stainer' [to AB], showing a country church in snow, with "and your dear ones" after the printed greeting, and thanking him "for your kind wishes received by wire". 3 sides 5" x 3¼". 41. May 1944. Part Newspaper Cutting with details of LH's will, headed "Leslie Howard left houses to his Staff", with a photograph of LH with Violette Cunnington, and a comment that his intentions for the two houses it mentioned "have been frustrated" (cutting defective thereafter). 2 sides 9¼" (max.) x 7½" (max.) Violette Cunnington was left the house in Beverly Hills, but died of pneumonia in late 1942. 42. 27th December 1945, 169 Chiltern Court, N.W.1. Affectionate ALS from Irene Howard to AB, with delayed "love and Xmas Greetings" and thanks "for the lovely book ... I see you sent a card to my Father", he died "last July ... a happy release ... he had not been very happy since my Mother died & I think Leslie's death was just about the end ... but ... so brave & uncomplaining", AB's son Christopher's being sent to India must be "maddening ... after five years in the Army ... poor old Ruth", LH's widow, "had a lonely Xmas as Doodie & her baby left just beforehand for Canada, & Wink is ... on the high seas ... She ... said she & Miss Gurfel were sitting round the fire ... like 'Arsenic & Old Lace' !! ... I'll see you very soon". 4 sides 8vo. 43. 1st August 1946, Byron House, 7/9 St. James's Street, S.W.1. TLS from Frederic Burgis, Solicitor, to AB, saying "... Ruth Howard's address is 'Caeburn', Parkgate Road, Newdigate, Surrey. She sold the house at Westcott [Stowe Maries] last year and I think we did very well with it". 1 side oblong 8vo. PACKET I - Tributes to Leslie Howard, 1944. 44. 23rd February 1944. Cutting from 'Queen' magazine, saying "the B.B.C.'s recent tribute ... was quite well done ... Howard himself might have okayed the script ... the attractive voice of Irene Howard ... had a touch of her brother in those quiet modulated tones", but the writer regrets the absence of Adrian Brunel who, "perhaps more than any other, could have paid that tribute, which the average film technician in this country has long wanted to pay to the memory of the 'Chief'". 1 side 1¾" x 4½". 45. 19th May 1944, 16 Princes Gate, S.W.7. Notice from the Royal Photographic Society of Great Britain, The Kinematograph Section, saying that on Saturday 3rd June 1944 "the members will assemble at the Denham Film Studios" for a tribute to LH arranged by A.W. Watkins, Section Chairman, "who co-operated with Leslie Howard on the production of most of the films he made in this country", about which he will speak and "introduce other celebrities" who worked with LH on "the following films", naming seven from 'The Scarlet Pimpernel' to 'The Lamp Still Burns', "extracts from which will be projected during the afternoon", followed by travel details. 1 side 10" x 8" 46. 30th May 1944, Denham Studios. TLS from A.W. Watkins to AB, signed 'Watty', asking him to lunch at the Studio before the LH 'Memorial Lecture'. 1 side 4to. On the back are a number of colour trials with a watercolour brush. 47. 3rd June 1944, Denham Studios. Admission ticket made out to AB and typed Order of Proceedings, listing the people introducing the film extracts from 'Service for Ladies' (1932, LH's first film with Alexander Korda), 'Scarlet Pimpernel', 'Pygmalion', '49th Parallel', AB on 'Pimpernel Smith', 'The Gentle ***', 'The Lamp Still Burns', and PCS on 'The First of the Few'. 1 side 3" x 4" and 1 side folio. 48. 3rd June 1944, Denham Studios. Remarkable and evocative Notes by AB typed in red and black for his thoughts on LH, with original alterations and additions, "we had r own little co. over 20 YEARS AGO - Mention this bcs I hope tt on some future occasion I can show you these earliest films of his ... during the last 2 years of hs life ... in many hours of talking off duty he revealed his wide interest in Life - in POETRY & POLITICS - ART & ETHICS - & much besides. U cannot divorce the man from his work ... in t scenes from the B.N. film Pmpl. Sm. ... you will notice illustrations ... how he despised violence and scorned the way the NAZIS had demoralized and corrupted a nation ... THESE WERE HIS OWN CONVICTIONS AND OFTEN HIS OWN LINES ...Thr is so much that I LOVED AND ADMIRED IN LESLIE ... but I think ... MOST was his ARTISTIC INTEGRITY. He wd never stoop to a cheap effect ...", and speaking of LH as his "IDEAL OF AN ENGLISHMAN". 1 side 8vo. 49. 6th June 1944. Press cutting from 'Today's Cinema', "200 Pay Tribute ... Last year Mr. Howard was to have given the annual address ...", and describing the present occasion, Mr. Sutro revealed that "as a result of 'The Lamp Still Burns' the London Hospital had erected a memorial tablet" to LH. 1 side 6¾" x 2", a few words slightly hidden from pasting ends together. 50. 8th June 1944. Press cutting from the 'Daily Film Renter', describing the occasion, "... Derrick de Marney said that he was not only a great artist, but also a shrewd businessman, and ... capable of getting out of other people the same vital, sincere performance" as himself. 1 side 5½" x 2". 51. 9th June 1944. Press cutting from the 'British Journal of Photography', parts of pp. 205-206, 'A tribute to a Great Man', "... nearly 200 members of the Kine Section ... participated ... The Theatre ... with all the restrained beauty of truly functional design, was a supremely fitting setting ... There quietly came from the audience, one by one, some of the most important people in films ... of the most varied types and character ... speaking ... with real emotion, and then quietly returning to the audience again", the writer summarizes the contributions, and talks of LH's "lightning ability when he changed from actor to producer in picking up the complex technicalities of film making ...". 1 side 3" x 8"and 1 side 4½" x 8". PACKET J - The Daily Mail, 1956. 52-56. Monday 10th September - Saturday 14th September 1956. 5 (of 6) parts of the story from the 'Daily Mail' by Ian Colvin, with many photographs, about the KLM flight from Lisbon in which LH died, based on Colvin's forthcoming book 'Flight 777', including Churchill's own telling of his reaction, that the Germans must have been stupid to think Churchill would have taken an unescorted flight in broad daylight, besides his own sadness (Monday), LH's breaking his Hollywood contract in 1939 to help the war effort, Chenhalls's role in the trip, "a week in Lisbon. Then off to Madrid", where LH lectured on 'Hamlet' and met Countess Miranda (Tuesday and Wednesday), German knowledge of the passenger lists, including LH and Chenhalls's last minute addition (Thursday), and an account of the attack from German sources (Friday), Friday's issue also advertises "the dramatic end of the ... mystery" the following Monday [not present]. Parts of'6 sides 23¾" x 16", worn in parts but with little loss.
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Datos de 04/08/2015 01:29h
Entrada de archivo:
9780992805302 - Howard: Not Far From Aviemore - Libro

(?):

Not Far From Aviemore (2015) (?)

Entrega de: Países BajosLibro está en idioma inglésNuevo libroe-Book, eBook, libro digital
ISBN:

9780992805302 (?) o 0992805309

, en inglés, Smashwords Edition, Nuevo, Ebook
A thirty-foot tall ghost, a faceless rapist and a hag who exists for no other reason than to witness torment. ‘There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.’Adam Forrester is a London scientist with a very unprofessional secret; he is a victim of Old Hag syndrome, a cruel and humiliating visitation he has endured since a child. Having lost hope his torment will ever leave, Adam undertakes an expedition to the Scottish Highlands, entering the realm of ... A thirty-foot tall ghost, a faceless rapist and a hag who exists for no other reason than to witness torment. ‘There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.’Adam Forrester is a London scientist with a very unprofessional secret; he is a victim of Old Hag syndrome, a cruel and humiliating visitation he has endured since a child. Having lost hope his torment will ever leave, Adam undertakes an expedition to the Scottish Highlands, entering the realm of the legendary Fear Liath Mòr, a giant spectre known for terrifying climbers on Ben Macdui. His task is to learn more on the dark side of the spirit world, desperate to manufacture a scenario of chaos that might break the hold his abusers have over him. But is his arrival on the cold and perilous heights of Britain’s most remote national park really his idea, why is his American colleague Becky involved, and what does it all have to do with M Theory? Productinformatie:Taal: Engels;Formaat: Epub zonder kopieerbeveiliging (DRM) ;Kopieerrechten: Het kopiëren van (delen van) de pagina's is niet toegestaan ;ISBN10: 0992805309;ISBN13: 9780992805302; Engels | Ebook | 2015
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Categoría: Thrillers en fantasy, Fantasy, Eigentijds
Datos de 23/06/2016 08:26h
ISBN (Notaciones alternativas): 0-9928053-0-9, 978-0-9928053-0-2
Entrada de archivo:
9780992805302 - Howard: Not Far From Aviemore - Libro

(?):

Not Far From Aviemore (2014) (?)

Entrega de: CanadáLibro está en idioma inglésNuevo libroe-Book, eBook, libro digitalproducto para descarga digital
ISBN:

9780992805302 (?) o 0992805309

, en inglés, Smashwords Edition, Smashwords Edition, Smashwords Edition, Nuevo, Ebook, descarga digital
A thirty-foot tall ghost, a faceless rapist and a hag who exists for no other reason than to witness torment. 'There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.'Adam Forrester is a London scientist with a very unprofessional secret; he is a victim of Old Hag syndrome, a cruel and humiliating visitation he has endured since a child. Having lost hope his torment will ever leave, Adam undertakes an expedition to the Scottish Highlands, entering the realm of the legendary Fear Liath Mòr, a giant spectre known for terrifying climbers on Ben Macdui. His task is to learn more on the dark side of the spirit world, desperate to manufacture a scenario of chaos that might break the hold his abusers have over him. But is his arrival on the cold and perilous heights of Britain's most remote national park really his idea, why is his American colleague Becky involved, and what does it all have to do with M Theory?
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Categoría: Sci Fi & Fantasy
Palabras clave: Not Far From Aviemore Howard Horror Sci Fi & Fantasy 9780992805302
Datos de 23/06/2016 08:26h
ISBN (Notaciones alternativas): 0-9928053-0-9, 978-0-9928053-0-2